Learning and controlling

IN THIS CHAPTER YOU'LL LEARN

  • Why learning is important for impact-oriented project work.
  • What constitutes a learning organization.
  • How you can learn and derive improvements from the results of your social impact analysis.
  • How you can identify troubled projects and put them back on track.
At the end of your sea journey, you and your crew reflect together on whether and to what degree you reached your destination, and how the journey went.
You discuss what you could do differently next time, and record these ideas in the travel report. Even while still at sea, you had regular conversations with your crew and asked passengers for their opinions in order to be able to react as quickly as possible to problems and complaints.
  • As the navigation data indicated deviations, you quickly corrected your course.
  • When food was left untouched, your research revealed that some passengers were seasick – so you added lighter food to the menu.
  • And so on and so forth, throughout the trip ...
In short: You reacted to situations from which you had learned. In the course of everyday project work, learning means that you regularly and critically engage with the findings from your from your social impact analysis: Whether and to what degree is the project (still) progressing toward your desired project objectives? Learning is thus a key requirement for quality, results and further project development. Without learning, there can be no social impact!
  • What’s the value in learning?

    Learning together
    • improves processes and procedures.
    • boosts the impact of your project.
    • helps you create and share knowledge.
    • helps you make sound decisions.
    • fosters motivation.
Learning is thus a key requirement for quality, results and further project development. Without learning, there can be no social impact! In the following sections, we’ll show you what impact-oriented learning looks like in practice. We’ll start by looking at the organizational conditions that need to be in place. Next, we’ll outline how learning functions both within a single organization and between organizations. Finally, we’ll explain how you can recognize whether your project is going off-track, and what you can do about it.